Amy Uliss - Ashland MA Real Estate, Framingham MA Real Estate, Natick MA Real Estate


For those who want to sell a house as quickly as possible, it often helps to think about what will happen after you list your residence. That way, you can plan ahead for the home selling journey and minimize the risk of potential roadblocks that otherwise may prevent you from achieving your property selling goals.

Ultimately, there are many questions for a seller to consider before listing a house. These include:

1. What makes my home unique?

No two houses are exactly alike, yet differentiating one home from another in a competitive real estate market may prove to be difficult. Fortunately, a seller who understands a residence's strengths and weaknesses can determine what makes his or her house unique. This seller then can develop a strategy to promote his or her residence to the right groups of prospective buyers.

Sometimes, it is beneficial to conduct a home inspection prior to listing a residence. With an inspection report in hand, a seller can analyze a house's strengths and weaknesses. This seller next can use the inspection report to prioritize home upgrades and find innovative ways to differentiate his or her residence from the competition.

2. How much is my home worth?

What you originally paid for your home is unlikely to match your residence's current value, regardless of when you bought your house. Thankfully, you can conduct a home appraisal to receive an accurate property valuation.

A home appraisal frequently helps a seller establish a competitive initial asking price for his or her house. After a home appraisal, it takes only a few days for a seller to receive an appraisal report. And once this report becomes available, a seller can use it to set an aggressive price for his or her house – something that may help this residence generate lots of interest from potential buyers.

3. Do I need to hire a real estate agent?

Hiring a real estate agent may be crucial, particularly for a seller who is uncertain about how to navigate the property selling journey. A real estate agent will help a seller develop a plan to quickly sell his or her house. Plus, a real estate agent will do whatever it takes to help a seller optimize his or her home sale earnings.

In addition, a real estate agent wants to help a home seller make informed decisions. He or she will educate a seller about the local housing market and ensure this individual understands all aspects of the home selling journey. And if a seller ever has concerns or questions during the home selling process, a real estate agent can provide immediate responses.

When it comes to selling a house, it is beneficial for a seller to prepare for the property selling journey. If a seller knows what to expect after he or she lists a residence, this individual can plan accordingly. Perhaps most important, a seller can map out the home selling journey and take the necessary steps to ensure a quick, seamless and profitable property selling experience.


This Single-Family in Ashland, MA recently sold for $705,000. This Garrison style home was sold by Amy Uliss - MDM Realty, Inc.


190 Winter Street, Ashland, MA 01721

Single-Family

$649,900
Price
$705,000
Sale Price

9
Rooms
4
Beds
3
Baths
Outstanding Garrison Colonial nestled on classic country road that backs onto Ashland Town Forest, yet minutes to shopping, schools and Ashland & Hopkinton State Park. This is a lovely home with flexible floor plan, stunning kitchen w/ granite counters, SS appliances and breakfast bar w/ sliders to sundeck, plus oversized eating area w/ gleaming hardwood floors and built in cabinets, sun-filled living room w/ wood fireplace and picture window. Join the family fun in the tremendous great room w/ cathedral ceiling, recessed lights and lovely exposed brick wall, easy to pop out to the stunning 1acre plus land, added fenced yard space and garden ready space. This property includes a private trailhead to hiking trails with 600+ acres. Lovely master bedroom with soaring vaulted ceiling, w/i close and private nicely updated master bath, 3 additional bedrooms with hardwood floors. LL tons of storage, garage access, updated high efficiency gas furnace & windows, AC, roof 2010!! Train 1.2 miles.

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In today's real estate market, hardwood floors are a highly desired feature in a house. Potential buyers are often turned off by homes with carpeted floors because it's almost impossible to keep them clean. Time is not on your side when it comes to maintaining nice-looking carpeted floors!

No matter how careful you are, sooner or later someone's going to knock over a glass of grape juice or wine -- and that's only the short list of accidents waiting to happen! While dogs and cats can be a wonderful addition to any family, they are not a friend of floors -- either carpeted or hardwood.

In theory, hardwood floors are easier to clean than carpeting because of the absorbency factor. If your carpeting hasn't been treated with a stain-resistant chemical, it will quickly absorb stains, spills, and pet accidents faster than you can clean them up! Although the latest carpeting materials are much more stain resistant than earlier versions, spills that are not noticed and cleaned up quickly may cause permanent damage.

Spills, water, and pet urine can also wreak havoc on hardwood floors, so a quick response is essential to preventing damage. Here are a few other tips for keeping your floors looking clean and beautiful.

  • Door mats can be helpful in minimizing the amount of dirt and grit that gets tracked into your home. What homeowners and even housekeepers sometimes forget is that door mats need to be shaken out on a regular basis. If they're not, dirt, soil, and other debris will accumulate on the mats, causing them to create more of a problem than a solution! Door mats need to be replaced periodically, too, when they become too worn down or wet to be of any use.
  • Shoe removal: This is a difficult policy to enforce, but it will make house cleaning and floor maintenance easier and more effective. Whether you're talking about carpeting or hardwood floors, shoes are invariably going to track in dirt, grime, water, mud, and other miscellaneous contaminants!
  • The right cleaning methods: Although it's always a good idea to follow manufacturer recommendations when cleaning any type of flooring, hardwood floors often need to be treated with more care than their carpeted counterparts. Since there are a lot of ways to scratch, dent, or gouge hardwood floor surfaces, it's crucial to avoid trying to scrub away spills or stains with any abrasive material. To remove potentially damaging grit, floors should be regularly cleaned with a soft dust mop or broom with soft bristles. Ideally, your vacuum cleaner should also be padded on the bottom to avoid scratching the finish of your wood floors.
While any kind of flooring can be subject to wear and tear over time, the good news is that you can take preventative steps to protect your floors and keep them looking great for many years to come!


Photo by Daniel Tuttle on Unsplash

Buying a home, especially for the first time, might feel a little scary—notably if you've learned the home you’re considering for purchase is a zombie property. Even a pro at buying property may flinch when they initially hear this term.

No worries, a zombie property is not as frightening as it sounds. It’s a common term used in the housing industry, originating back to the 2007-08 housing crisis when tens of thousands of these homes were left behind because their owners couldn’t afford to make their mortgage payments.

What is a Zombie Property?

A zombie property creeps up when no one retains accountability for it. It usually occurs when homeowners leave their homes after receiving a foreclosure notice and incorrectly believe they must immediately vacate the property. They often don't realize there is an entire foreclosure process, one that doesn’t happen overnight. In most instances, they believe the lender that sent the notice will take over responsibility for the property, so they move out. In some cases, they do know they can stay but choose not to delay the inevitable and cut loose in search of greener pastures.

Meanwhile, the lender, for whatever reason, doesn’t complete the foreclosure process they initiated and the property stands abandoned. Since the homeowner has already walked away not realizing they still technically own the property, and the lender also doesn’t assume ownership, no one takes responsibility for the home. It essentially sits in a state of limbo—hence it being referred to as a “zombie.” Its ownership is not quite alive (abandoned), but not yet dead (foreclosed upon) either.

Pros of Purchasing a Zombie Property

The primary benefit of purchasing a zombie property is the price. Most of these properties are typically sold below market value, sometimes at rock bottom prices. Because some of them are eyesores, or have the potential to become attractive to squatters, municipalities and towns are eager to get these homes rehabbed and inhabited. This means buyers who are handy with repairs or who have the investment money available to fix up and flip the home for a profit can make out handsomely with this type of sale.

Cons of Purchasing a Zombie Property

While the financial benefits associated with zombie homes are lucrative, there are some potential pitfalls to be careful of when considering a purchase. In most instances, the original owner still retains the title to the home, so this legal detail will need to be addressed. Buyers also have to consider these homes may have deterioration, unsafe conditions or be unsanitary. This is especially a concern for properties that have been abandoned for a long period of time. Additionally, it takes more effort to navigate a zombie property purchase than a traditional foreclosure since no one is actively involved with the property.

Many potential buyers intentionally or inadvertently overlook zombie properties, but if you’re in the market, it’s not an option you should automatically discount. Don't let the zombie moniker fool you.  If you perform your due diligence and find ways to mitigate any drawbacks, you could potentially land yourself a great home, rental investment, or profitable house-flip.


While buying a home is an exciting time, many buyers actually regret their home purchase. One of the biggest regrets that people have is the size of the house they purchased. People either pick a home that’s too large or too small. It may be hard to imagine that you can make a mistake on the size of the home that your purchase. You go into the home buying process knowing how many bedrooms you need and what type of home you might like. Once you begin living in the house, you could find a different story. You may not have enough space for all of your family’s belongings. On the flip side, you could find the amount of space in your home as overwhelming. 

Buying a home isn’t like buying most other things. You can’t easily return it, and there’s quite a bit of an upfront investment that must be made in order to make the purchase. It’s not simple to make a change if you buy the wrong house. The wrong purchase could set you back in making a move for years to come. 

Shop Smart

The best thing to do when shopping for a home is not only to see the home in its current state but what type of potential the house has. Can you add on to the home? Would you be able to make use of all the space the home has? Is there enough storage in the house? Are there ways to quickly add storage? These are a lot of things to consider when shopping for a home but they’re all important questions. Once you move into the home, other than doing a complete overhaul, you may be out of options to improve it without looking for these areas. Of course, the ideal situation is to find a home that already has everything you’re looking for in it.      

Don’t Buy Until You’re Ready

Another mistake that people make is they try to go from renting to owning before they’re ready. Living in an apartment or rental allows for a bunch of advantages that owning a home may not afford you. Owning a home takes commitment, and some people just aren’t ready. Just because it’s widely known knowledge that buying a home is a smart financial decision, doesn’t mean it’s always the best decision for you. You may not be able to afford a house that’s the right size for your family. You may not even know what the right size home will be for you. When these questions remain, you could end up buying a property that’s the wrong size. Don’t worry if you need to take a few more years to save up for a house. On the contrary, don’t worry if you don’t think buying a home is the right decision for you at all.     






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