Amy Uliss - Ashland MA Real Estate, Framingham MA Real Estate, Natick MA Real Estate


Navigating the home selling journey can be difficult, regardless of whether you're an experienced or first-time property seller. Fortunately, we're here to help you limit the possibility of encountering home selling problems that otherwise may prevent you from achieving your desired results.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you avoid risks during the home selling journey.

1. Learn About the Housing Market

What sets your residence apart from others on the real estate market? Ultimately, if you allocate time and resources to learn about the local real estate sector, you can promote your residence to the right groups of prospective buyers.

Take a look at the prices of homes that are similar to your own and are located in your city or town. With this real estate market information, you can narrow the price range for your residence.

Also, check out the prices of recently sold houses in your area and find out how long these homes were available before they were sold. This real estate market information will enable you to determine whether you're about to enter a buyer's or seller's market.

2. Establish an Aggressive Price for Your House

An aggressive initial home asking price can be a difference-maker during the home selling journey. Because if you have an aggressive asking price in place for your home, you could boost the likelihood of a fast house sale.

Conducting a home appraisal enables you to understand the value of your house based on its age, condition and the current state of the housing market. This appraisal is performed by a property expert, and it may help you establish an aggressive initial home asking price from day one of the home selling journey.

In addition, it may be beneficial to complete a home inspection. If a home inspector analyzes your residence both inside and out, he or she can help you identify potential problems. Then, you can perform various home upgrades to boost the value of your home.

3. Remain Flexible

The home selling journey typically varies from seller to seller. However, if you remain flexible as you proceed along this journey, you may be better equipped than other home sellers to identify and address problems before they escalate.

If you require extra assistance during the home selling journey, you may want to hire a real estate agent as well. This housing market professional can guide you along the home selling journey and take the guesswork out of listing your residence.

A real estate agent will help you add your residence to the housing market, promote your house to potential buyers and set up open house events and home showings. Plus, if you receive an offer to purchase your residence, a real estate agent will help you review this proposal and make an informed home selling decision.

Avoid problems throughout the home selling journey – use the aforementioned tips, and you can quickly detect and resolve any potential home selling issues.


Being in the market for a new home can be both an exciting experience and a scary one! It not only represents a huge financial commitment, but it also forces you to step out of your "comfort zone."

That's especially true if you're a first-time home buyer. When you make the switch from being a renter to a home owner, you no longer have the "luxury" of depending on your landlord for repairs, yard maintenance, or help with plumbing emergencies. Now, when the AC quits or the furnace conks out, the responsibility (and cost) of getting it fixed rests squarely on your shoulders!

Fortunately, there are steps you can take to minimize the possibility of incurring major expenses during the first couple years of owning a home. While there are (usually) no guarantees that household mechanical systems won't fail or that other crises won't befall you as a new homeowner, there are choices you can make that will reduce the chances of being saddled with unexpected expenses.

Buying a home with a newer roof, energy-efficient appliances, updated HVAC system, and a dry basement are four ways you can sidestep many predictable problems down the road. Wear and tear will eventually take its toll on everything from hot water heaters to microwave ovens, but if you can postpone having to replace appliances, roofs, and climate-control systems for several years or more, it will be a lot easier on you and your budget!

So all things being equal, home ownership will be more pleasurable and affordable if you choose a home with recent upgrades, replacements, and improvements -- preferably, those done within the past five or ten years. Besides comparing the maintenance history of houses you're considering, there's also the essential step of hiring an experienced structural inspector. When you've narrowed down your house-buying possibilities to one preferred home, a property inspector can help you identify "red flags" and potential problems before you close on that house.

As your real estate agent will probably tell you, if any major problems are identified in the home inspection process, you may be in a position to renegotiate the agreement or withdraw your offer, entirely. Since legalities are often complex and every real estate transaction is different, however, it's always essential to consult with an experienced real estate attorney whenever questions, problems, or complications arise in a real estate purchase or sale.

While it's a good idea to "expect the unexpected" when purchasing and moving into a new home, it pays to work with a team of trusted advisors. Working with a seasoned real estate agent, a knowledgeable real estate attorney, and a reputable property inspector will help make sure that your experience is both satisfying and relatively problem free! Knowing what you want and being adamant about what matters most to you should also serve you well in the house buying process.


Photo by Monkey Business Images via Shutterstock

Homeownership is a marvelous thing. Many folks go to extraordinary lengths to make it happen for their household. One thing that makes ownership difficult is affordability in the same locale as your employment. When that's the case, many potential buyers begin searching outside their comfortable commuting radius to find an affordable house.

Before you commit to a commute, consider a few of the challenges commuting adds to your life. Then, weigh those against the joy of owning a home in a community you love.

Traffic

Before you take the plunge and buy the house that you have your eye on, make an effort to drive to the neighborhood early one morning and then make the commute to your job. While one day of commuting doesn't give you the full picture, you'll quickly know if traffic is a deal-breaker for you.

Of course, other options exist. If coworkers also live in that community, you could ride-share so that you're not the one behind the wheel every day. Some so-called "bedroom communities" offer group ride-share programs for commuters. In that case, you might thoroughly enjoy relaxing in a luxury van reading the paper or reviewing reports on your way to work.

Shopping

Often forgotten in the lure of homeownership is the potential "commute" to shopping locations. If your favorite store doesn't have a local outlet or the nearest grocery store is a significant distance, the shopping commute could nix your plans. While it may not seem like a problem now, when you've commuted to work all week, the last thing you want to do with your weekend is drive 45-minutes to the grocery store or make an additional trip into town to buy shoes.

Entertainment

Finally, what you do for pleasure should inform your choice as well. When you find yourself staying late in town to go to the theater or see friends, heading back out to the ’burbs to sleep might get old.

Even if you love the countryside and the chance to own a house, commuting isn’t for everyone. Before you give up on your dreams, though, talk to a knowledgeable real estate agent inside your commute radius. There might be options for ownership that you’re unaware of such as pocket listings or distressed homes.


If you’re ready to buy a home, you probably have done a lot of research. One thing is sure: You know you need to get pre-approved for a mortgage. It’s perhaps the most critical step in the process of buying a home for a variety of reasons. There’s down payments and debt-to-income ratios, and other financial issues to worry about. You need to know what type of mortgage you should get. To help you understand what kind of mortgage you need, you should get pre-approved.


Understand The Pre-Approval Process


There are many misconceptions about pre-approvals. First, buyers need to understand that there is a difference between a pre-qualification and a pre-approval. A pre-qualification merely scrapes the surface of your financial state, while a pre-approval goes through everything a mortgage company will need to grant you a loan. You may be pre-qualified for a much higher amount than you can actually afford, for example.


Pre-Approval Defined


A pre-approval is a lender’s written commitment to a borrower. The approval states that the lender is willing to lend a certain amount of money for a home. The lender obtains the following from the buyer:


  • Employment history
  • Credit report
  • Tax returns
  • Bank statements


The time and effort that it takes to get a pre-approval is worth it because everything will be ready for the lender to grant the mortgage once an offer is made on a home. It also gives the buyer an upper hand in finding the home of their dreams. Many sellers require a pre-approval with an offer.


When To Get A Pre Approval


As soon as you know you’re serious about buying a home and are ready to start the house hunt, you should get pre-approved. Pre-approvals do expire after a certain amount of time, but lenders can renew them with proper notice. 


The Importance Of The Pre-Approval


Many buyers feel that they can skip the pre-approval process altogether. It has many benefits. Besides giving you a better look at your finances and how much house you can afford, pre-approvals can:


  • Give you the insight to correct your credit score and help you correct credit problems
  • Help to avoid disappointment when you find a home you love
  • Allow first-time buyers to see all of the costs involved in buying a home


A pre-approval is a handy thing to have, and it’s not just because the experts say it’s essential. Getting pre-approved for a mortgage can help you to be more on top of your finances going into one of the most significant purchases you'll ever make in your life. 

 


Photo by Rodrigo Souza from Pexels

Want to reveal that hardwood under your carpet? Or maybe you're ready to lay down new flooring? In either case, carpet removal by a professional adds significant cost to the project. Fortunately, removing carpet is something you can do yourself with minimal cost.

It does require a little upper body strength and some patience. So be ready to put your back into it. 

And know that carpet removal is a "no harm; no foul" kind of job. If you find it's more than you can complete, professionals aren't going to charge you more because you did some work before they got there.

What you'll need

  • Duct tape 
  • Utility knife 
  • Dust mask
  • Work gloves (on the thicker side)
  • Old towel and vacuum for cleanup
  • Empty trash bin or rental dumpster for disposal
  • Set aside at least two hours per room. But if you're new to a home project like this one, it might take longer.

    Step one: pick a corner

    If the carpet is coming up in a specific spot like next to the door, start there. While wearing your gloves and mask, try to pull it up from the edge. In some areas, sharp tack strips hold down the carpet. So be careful.

    *Pro tip* Go into a wide stance and don't put all your strength into the tug to avoid falling over if it gives suddenly.

    If there's no right place to start pulling or it won't give, carefully cut a 6" square into the carpet in the corner of the room. Then begin cutting and removing section by section. Be careful with the knife, especially if you want to preserve the flooring underneath.

    Eventually, you'll get to a point where you can pull up a huge section.

    Step two: deal with the carpet scraps

    Fold and roll large pieces of carpet. Use duct tape to secure it for easy carrying. Then grab a friend to help you take it outside. Gather the smaller scraps and place them in a bin or dumpster.

    Step three: remove the padding

    The padding is tacked down with staples along the perimeter. The padding will already be shredded in places where you cut the carpet, so simply start pulling it up slowly. 

    The staples should come up with it. But if any remain, you can get them up with a regular staple puller or something similar.

    *Pro tip* If you need to use a prying tool, wear eye protection.

    Now, repeat step two with the padding.

    That's it. You're ready to have a professional lay new carpet or pull up your tack strips to lay a different type of flooring. 

    For more fun, DIY-friendly projects, follow our blog.




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